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Juan Fajardo

Juan Fajardo

The Photographer who wanted to be a Musician
By Blanca Lacasa

“An anecdote? Well, even though I’m not the biggest KISS fan, I remember some photos that I took of them. I’d already seen them live and photographed them playing, but being with them in their dressing rooms, with all that paraphernalia, was nuts. I freaked out when I saw them without makeup and in those crazy outfits that look incredible on stage but up close seem like they’ve been bought in Poundland. The thing is, I wanted to take a picture of Paul Stanley touching up his makeup in the mirror. I asked for permission and he told me: “You can’t take that picture because, by contract, KISS can only be photographed with front light.” Juan continued: “Can you believe that? Everything has to be set in stone for Americans. Amazing!”

This is just one of a thousand anecdotes that the photographer, Juan Pérez-Fajardo (Madrid, 1969), keeps in his memory. He is rightly considered one of the great Spanish music photographers, and his camera has captured the likes of Loquillo, Enrique Bunbury, Luz Casal, El Cigala and Camela, as well as international superstars such as Nick Lowe, Bobby Gillespie, Santana and Neneh Cherry. Some have been portrayed almost in spite of themselves (like Patti Smith, who wasn’t having her best day, “she was just rude, but it’s understandable because she had been on a European book signing tour”), others with the urgency and authenticity that posing five minutes before showtime gives (Bobby Gillespie with that unmistakable, unchangeable gesture of his) and many others – the majority – posing for the usual album launch. I’ve hardly ever worked with models, it’s just too easy. You tell them: “look over there” or “put your hand like this” and they nail it. However, for many musicians, promo photos are a pain in the butt and you have to win their trust. You have to get them to forget about the camera so that it isn’t an imposing situation and they don’t feel like you are stealing their soul. There is a lot of psychological groundwork to be done beforehand because I want the musician’s craft to be immediately understood, so I need them to trust me. This blind faith is based on the fact that Pérez-Fajardo is a musician at heart. He looks and moves as if he were one of the band. He is, in a way, the artistic version of the frustrated musician, the term that perfectly describes a music critic.

Although he was determined to be a musician from when he was a child, (he also played in a couple of bands), he had to conform with being the person who expressed, in a single image, what happens in concerts. “Deep down I would have loved to be the one in the photo, but in the end, I work within the music industry, which is something that gives me great pleasure.” Pérez-Fajardo started out by chance. He was kicked off a Physics degree that bored him to tears and booted out of his high-earning job in the entertainment industry because of the 2008 financial crisis. He then started work as a concert photographer, purely by chance. Luck gave him a huge push one night in Madrid. “ I was showing a friend some photos of my trip to Utah in El Sol Club and Eva (from the group Amaral) saw them, loved them and understood what I was about. Shortly afterwards, the South by Southwest Festival took place. As I wanted to work with Rolling Stone magazine, I came up with the idea of contacting Amaral and telling them that Rolling Stone was interested in me going to the festival with them to take photos, and I told the magazine that I had spoken to Amaral and that they wanted me to take photos of them. I’ve never done this sort of thing again because it’s not right, but I guess it worked out really well…” You better believe it you cheeky b******!

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Hoteles con mucho ritmo

Hoteles con mucho ritmo

By Laura Martínez

As Bowie said: “Put on your red shoes and dance the blues.” At Concept, music is the soul of each hotel, with the sounds of Rock ‘n’ Roll, Funk, Disco, Balearic House, Swing and Cha-cha-chá providing each one
with a unique personality. Both the DJs that play in the hotels and the playlists perfectly sum up the vibe in each establishment.

 

Santos Ibiza

Your favourite artists of all time are elevated to the category of saints in Santos Ibiza, our celebrity temple dedicated to artists closely connected with Ibiza. This hotel’s soundtrack is full of Balearic house, disco, a little bit o’ deep and a whole
lotta downtempo. The music changes as the day progresses, starting at breakfast, which is enlivened with soul and bossa before giving way to Balearic sounds, house and funk in late morning. DJs take control of the afternoon, spinning deep house, nu-disco and funk, perfect for lying back on a sunbed while sipping a “Ain’t No Saint” cocktail.

Tropicana Ibiza

Mi-Mo aesthetics, vibrant colours and nods to “Cocktail,” (Tom Cruise’s classic 80s movie that makes you want to live in a bar forever) provide the inspiration for Tropicana, the hotel where you can sip on a cocktail while admiring the pool and the shower in the form of a Martini glass. Wrapped in a Miami Beach tropical ambience, its sound is a mix of “disco funk, tropical Jazz, 80’s vibes and bossa nova,” as defined by Simøne, the hotel’s resident DJ.

Dorado Ibiza

A love letter to the golden era of rock. This is the Dorado Ibiza’s statement of intent, backed up by the best in classic rock, folk, 70s and soul. This is a temple of Rock by the sea, where each of the hotel’s rooms is named after a song that went gold. Acclaimed artists such as Jim Morrison, Blondie and Bruce Springsteen have a room dedicated to them, and when the guest enters, the record which bears the room’s name starts to play on a turntable. The bathrooms are fitted with retro microphone heads so that guests can sing like a star while having a shower.

Music takes you to another place, and our hotels are designed to teleport you to Miami, Cuba or Nashville, without leaving Ibiza. Image and soundtrack have never been in such harmony.

Cubanito Ibiza

The flavour and character of Cuba are to be found in Cubanito hotel, with touches of Latin Jazz, Salsa, Boogaloo and Merengue. Jordi Cardona is in charge of putting rhythm to the eternal sunsets, (with a Mojito in hand) that take place on the rooftop of this little piece of Cuba in the Mediterranean. In addition, each Tuesday you can enjoy Salsero, our Salsa classes where you can give free rein to your hips. On Sundays, there are live performances from legends such as Ricardito, the “Cuban Julio Iglesias” who has sung with Celia Cruz and Juan Luis Guerra.

Romeo’s Motel & Diner

Everything that you’ve seen in the American films from the 50s, 60s and 70s is about to happen to you in Romeo’s Motel & Diner. Inspired by the ‘love motels’ on Route 66, Romeo’s is our most cinematographic hotel. It includes a specially designed room for getting up to no good doing bad things in, a 24-hour diner worthy of a Tarantino movie, and a chapel where you can get married, and divorced, on the same night – just like in Las Vegas. Folk, Americana, Classic Rock and a lot of 70s put the neon-lighted cherry on the top of your wildest adventure.

Paradiso Ibiza Art Hotel

Paradiso Ibiza Art Hotel is our very own pastel pink paradise, where both art and Art Deco aesthetics merge into a dreamlike space. What do these dreams sound like? Nu-Disco, Italo Disco, Balearic Beat and 80s Funk. An art gallery curated by Adda Gallery Paris, a tattoo studio, exhibitions in the lobby and a glass-walled room that isn’t for wallflowers… Ocean Drive in Miami would just love to do all this…

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Siloé

Siloé

The band Siloé will broadcast live the recording of their new album Paradiso, from Suite Zero of the Paradiso Ibiza hotel.

The duo will stay for three days in the “Zero Suite”, which is a fully glazed room located in the reception area in view of the hotel’s clients.
The band will broadcast the experience through Youtube Live and IG Live in the purest “Big Brother” style, so that the public can know the whole process and get closer to their fans.

The Valladolid duo Siloé will visit the Paradiso Ibiza Art Hotel, belonging to the businessman and hotelier, Diego Calvo, owner of the Ibiza Concept Hotel Group, to record their album. The album will be inspired by the hotel’s imagination: disco, house and synthwave music with the sonic essence of the band. It will also have stellar collaborations such as Bely Basarte and David Otero, among other artists, and producers such as Ale Acosta from Fuel Fandango, GARABATTO or PMP.
With the intention of also demonstrating the acoustic and electronic duality of the band, all the songs will also be released in an acoustic version and in a version remixed by a national DJ, joining all the songs at the end of their publication in a triple album: singles , acoustic versions and electronic remixes.

The group assures that it is one of the most interesting and fascinating challenges they have faced throughout their career. Staying in the “Suite Zero” (a glass-enclosed room in the hotel reception for any visitor to see) and recording your new album there, to be broadcast through a camera on YouTube Live and Instagram Live, is to recreate the experience of living a “Big Brother”, but creating a performance inside the hotel.

 

“We want to do something that goes beyond music. In the end life and the music industry is very similar to Big Brother or The Island of Temptations: either you know what your role is quickly so that people pay attention to you or you are out. “
Paradiso’s first single will be out in November and they will continue to release new ones throughout 2022 until completing the PARADISO EP album.

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The Real Ones- Juanito

Love for Tradition

Joan Riera is Juanito to his friends, the endearing owner of the Ca n’Alfredo restaurant situated in the heart of Ibiza on Paseo Vara de Rey. It’s renowned as a meeting place and for its great food. It was awarded with the Gold Medal of Ibiza in 2010 and has been a flagship of traditional Ibizan cuisine since 1934. Ca n’Alfredo is about casual chats with friends after lunch, Saturday matança rice and flaó (cheesecake) with the family. It’s a home and a refuge, a place where you stop to say hello to Joan and give him your grandfather or your mother’s regards. He is the maître d’ of the restaurant and his wife, Catalina, is in charge of the kitchen. We’ll be chatting about culinary tradition and passion for a job well done. I suggest you read this interview after eating or be prepared to drool.

I get the feeling that Ibicencan cuisine doesn’t get the hype that Basque, Asturian or Canarian cuisine gets? I’d never heard of sofrit pagès (country sofrito) or greixonera in my life until I came to live here. It is one of the most elaborate and tasty cuisines in Spain, and I’m this is coming from a native of Asturias.
“Without a doubt. In the 70s, Ibiza had a massive influx of tourists and the island became filled with characterless restaurants, with Ibizan cuisine reduced down to just four traditional places. I consider myself a promoter of our culinary traditions and along with the Consell de Ibiza, we managed to create a brand called Sabors d’Eivissa (Flavours of Ibiza) that advocates local cuisine and produce. It really took off, and we have been present at countless food fairs such as Madrid Fusión. I’m proud to say that Ibizan cuisine is in rude health nowadays, with more quality as opposed to quantity on the island.”

 

As your friend and colleague Juan Mari Arzak mentions in the prologue of your book Ca n’Alfredo – History, Memories and Cuisine: “the commitment to human values is more important than the commitment to gastronomy.” Is attention and care just as important as quality cuisine?
“Juan Mari is a great friend of mine and he gave me the best recipe that anyone could give: “No te jubiles ni pa’ Dios”(Don’t retire, not even for God) This is a lifelong passion, and what makes me happiest is that people leave my restaurant with a big smile. It is in meeting a child who came here with his parents and then to see him again when he’s 40 years old with his wife and children sitting at the table. That makes me as proud as a peacock. Cuisine needs a lot of care, but you have to take even more care of your customers and friends.”

In the beginning, Ca n’Alfredo was called “Verner and Gertrudis” and was run by a German couple. It was later run by a German Jewish couple who came to Ibiza fleeing the Nazis. How did it end up in the hands of your father, Josep?
“Yes, the German Jewish couple were very hard-working. My father bought this place from them and they then set up a little hotel on the beach in San Antonio. They were the ones who originally gave the restaurant its name because they had 7 sons, with the eldest called Alfredo. Later I added Ca n’ (House of) and my eldest son is called Alfredo. I tried it later with some of my grandchildren, but they wouldn’t let me.”

What is the house speciality? The dish you have to order, no matter what.
“We make fantastic rice dishes and stews. I’m very proud of our baked fish and typical dishes such as sofrit pagès.”

I am surprised by the number of restaurants I’ve discovered on the island. There is a lot of competition. How do you manage to remain a reference point after so many years?
“It’s very complicated, I’m not going to lie. I think it is based on how much I love my job and a lot of perseverance. When you enjoy what you do and put your heart and soul into it… it can’t go wrong.”

The walls of your restaurant are decorated with photos of your most famous diners. Which person did you like but didn’t know who they were at first?
“Well, I remember a very tall and very nice guy who came to eat with his parents; Ricky Rubio, now he’s a star in the NBA, but when he came here he was just starting to make a name for himself in Barça’s basketball team. I’m a big football fan, but I don’t know anything about basketball. The kid loved our food and wanted to take a photo with the cooks, not the other way around!. Then I found out who he was and I’ve followed his meteoric rise to the top, which I’m most happy about.”

Your wife Catalina is in charge of the kitchen, so who controls the stove at home?
My wife! What I’m very good at is crispy fried eggs cooked at high heat, with some chips and sobrasada… yummy!

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Marcos Torres

MARCOS TORRES

11th September – 1st November

This Ibicenco is a graphic artist with an extensive career in the arts, on a national and international level. His particular style is characterised by a strong connection with music, cinema, Pop mythology and passion through which he transmits to the viewer a powerful and sensual aesthetic.

Marcos will close the exhibition series in Paradiso’s lobby with his recognisable and characteristic visual narrative, dominated by the cult of colour and visual impact.

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My “Fetish” Hoteliers

MY “FETISH” HOTELIERS

Andrés Saravia & Marc Rahola, Hoteliers for the Fun of it.

By Pablo Burgués
Photo: Maria Andreu

Another year, another interview with Diego Calvo; CEO, Co-founder, human being and top dog at Concept Hotel Group. This time we’ll be chewing the fat about Andrés Saraiva and Marc Rahola, two guys who are almost as nuts as he is about hotels.

Howdy Diego, what do these two gentlemen have in common?
“Both of them have shaken up the hotel sector, bringing enormous added value to their products through art.”You’ll have to forgive me, but I’m a smalltown boy, so you’ll have to explain this to me nice and simple… “In their hotels, as well as sleeping and eating like a fucking boss, you are surrounded by art wherever you go.”

Now I got ya. Tell me, in four sentences who is Andrés Saraiva is and why you like his work so much.
“Saraiva is first and foremost an artist, and a renowned graffiti artist who ran out of walls in his native Paris in 2011 and decided to set up Hotel Amour. The building became his new blank canvas, and with the collaboration of other friends and artists he designed and decorated one of the most inspiring and coolest hotels I’ve ever slept in. And I’ve slept in a few.”

Are you the kind of person that takes the hotel bathrobe with you as a souvenir?
“Taking things from a hotel always seemed kinda lame for me, but I did take one thing from the Amour, something that I always carry with me… I was lucky enough to meet Andrés in person and I liked his work so much that I got a tattoo on my left arm of a heart designed by the man himself.”

What about Marc Rahola?
“Marc is crazy about art, a hotelier with the soul of a gallery owner, an art patron…. His hotels stand out because they are continually hosting concerts and exhibitions. He also has some great initiatives aimed at helping emerging artists, such as the OD Awards, an annual prize which I had the honour of being a member of the jury in the latest edition. As if this wasn’t enough, he also loves rock ‘n’ roll like me and he even had his own band in the 90s called Occam Kepler, with whom he played in legendary concert halls such as KGB and Ars Studio.”

When are you gonna get a tattoo designed by Rahola on the other arm?
“Hahahahaha, I haven’t had it done yet, but don’t rule anything out with me. I’m a very passionate guy and if I like something, I love it to death, to the point of getting a tattoo.”

Apart from your body, are there art spaces in your hotels?
“Of course, in Dorado we have a permanent exhibition of some of the most amazing photos in rock history. Paradiso has its own gallery that is open to everyone. When I was a kid the only way of seeing artwork by international artists was by getting a plane to Madrid, London, Paris… at Concept Hotel Group we are doing our bit to enable locals to enjoy the work of world class artists without leaving the island.”

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The Mystery of The Pink Flamingo

THE MYSTERY OF THE PINK FLAMINGO

The Kitsch Icon

By Laura Martínez

We chat with Javier Polo, director of the documentary film about the mysterious iconography behind this particularly pink bird. An animal that is rarely seen, but at the same time is omnipresent. The film has been released in cinemas across Spain, a heroic deed in times of pandemic.

It can appear as a pool float on the beach, on the vase that your mother gave you as a Xmas pressie, or on the lighter that your friend passes you need a light outside a bar. At first glance these things have nothing in common, but if you look closely, you’ll discover that they are all flamingo inspired, either in its form or through drawings and borrowed elements: the beak, the skinny legs that bend backwards, its pink plumage. It’s here, there and everywhere. Pink flamingo fever has haunted the world for longer than we can remember, and at last someone has launched an investigation into all this madness.

 

Javier and Guillermo Polo – The Polo Brothers – have embarked on a coast-to-coast journey across the USA; the land of eccentricity, the land of kitsch. It is the beginning, and most likely will be the end, of this obsession. The Polos travelled to Miami, Las Vegas, Chicago and Los Angles in search of the true meaning behind the pink flamingo. Javier is clear about why he chose this particular topic: “I didn’t choose the pink flamingo, the pink flamingo chose me, just like Rigo in the film. I couldn’t escape, it was so inevitable that the only way of curing the fever was by literally making a film about it.

Javier remembers that one of the most gratifying parts of the filmmaking process was when he searched for the actors to play the characters who are in love with the figure of the pink flamenco. They all accompany the main character, Rigo Pex, (Meneo) whom Javier describes as: “musician, performer, Tasmanian Devil, Radio 3 presenter and cultural agitator, in that order.” Rigo is helped on his quest by kitsch obsessed actor and director Eduardo Casanova, Alicante based painter and muralist Antonyo Marest, the irreverent, cult filmmaker John Waters and music guru Allee Willis, the songwriter behind many hit songs, including Earth, Wind and Fire’s foot stomping classic “September.”

Known as one of the music industry’s most colourful characters, she unfortunately passed away after suffering a cardiac arrest in 2019. Javier gets emotional when he talks about her: “born in 1947 in Detroit, she was a lesbian whose love of black music and culture developed early. An artist in the broadest sense of the word and an admirable person, she was always brave and pioneering, and she gave us an awe-inspiring interview to close the film.” Despite the fine choice of characters in the film, Javier admits that they were gutted to miss out on interviewing singer and songwriter of Electric Six, Tyler Spencer, and he also admits that the hardest part was editing down John Waters’ interview because “everything that came out of his mouth was pure gold.”

Javier and Guillermo’s cinephilia comes from their parents; their mother took them to see Tarantino films at the tender age of eight, and their father showed them classic flicks by the Marx Brothers, Kubrick and Woody Allen. “We always had long chats and debates about films. The truth is that we had the privilege of discovering so much cinema, at a very young age, so it was a natural that we ended up as filmmakers.” The film’s predilection for pastel tones and colourful aesthetics are influenced by legendary directors from Wong Kar Wai and Wes Anderson to Pedro Almodóvar, and are also present in our hotels: Paradiso, Tropicana and Cubanito, where part of the film was shot.The next film by the Polo Brothers will be a black comedy called “Pobre Diablo” (Poor Devil), which this time will see Guillermo take up the directing reigns, about a frustrated writer who has to travel from Asturias to Benidorm with his brother’s dead body in order to fulfil his dying wish. One thing’s for sure, they don’t lack imagination….

 
 
 
 
 
 
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The Bleuve

THE BLEUVE

Concept Hotel Group and The Bleuve join forces to say goodbye to summer.

The independent brand of hand-painted jackets has created a design that breathes the arty aesthetic and the highly valued values ​​of the PARADISO IBIZA ART Hotel group brand.

 

This jewel jacket will be auctioned on September 5, 2021. The amount raised from this auction will go to the NGO Ibiza Preservation Foundation, which ensures the same values ​​as both brands.

 

The auction will be carried out based on the bids made by the public that attends the event in person or via streaming to the online event that will be broadcast.

The Bleuve was born with the aim of seeking to be part of a fashion sector that is more aware of the processes of creating designs through slow fashion and upcycling, giving a second life to vintage denim jackets.

 

Our brand values ​​are NATURE, ART and SUSTAINABILITY and we try to represent them in the designs of each limited edition collection. Having a The Bleuve jacket in your closet means having something that represents your way of being and of seeing life. With what you know who you really are, you are comfortable and you take pride in being who you are.

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Legendary Hotels

LEGENDARY HOTELS

Chateau Marmont: The Hotel that knows how to Keep things Quiet
By Pablo Burgués

 

If a celebrity hasn’t overdosed in your hotel; if a rock star hasn’t sashayed around your lobby in the buff; if no one has used one of your rooms to stage an orgy of biblical proportions… then I feel morally obliged to say that yours is not a decent hotel, but a sad campsite with doors. Or worse still, a resort.

And if the homo sapiens were a trustworthy animal, a hotel’s category would not be measured by anodyne TripAdvisor reviews, but by the quantity and quality of the debauchery that goes on behind its walls. If this was so, the Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles would have more stars than Orion’s belt.

 

One of these shameful (as well as wonderful) events featured Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham. One hot summer night the band’s manager was in a meeting in the Marmont’s lobby with the lawyers from a major record company. After months of tough negotiations, a new multi-million dollar contract was about to be finalised between the two parties. Well, good old Sir Bonham couldn’t think of a better way to show his appreciation and respect for the label than to ride around the hotel lobby on his Harley, stark naked. According to the story, nobody was hurt, but I hope the bike’s saddle was made of quality leather, because the combination of “ fake leather” + “summer sweat” + “bareback sphincter” can generate a vacuum effect of more than 7 atmospheres and they wouldn’t be able to remove the bike from your arse with a circular saw.

And while we’re on the subject of skin and drums, another famous episode had Keith Moon (the uncool one from The Who) as its star. After seeing a television fly out of Keith Richards’ (the uncool Rolling Stone) bedroom window, he decided to up the ante and threw his sofa out of the window and into the swimming pool. In his own words, he did it “to see if it could float”, an existential crisis that has accompanied man since his origins.

As far as fucking goes, rumour has it that Johnny Depp and his then girlfriend (the always discreet and restrained Kate Moss) got down and dirty on each and every single bed in the Marmont. Not bad going considering that there are 63 rooms in the hotel, many of them with extra beds… but personally I find Dennis Hopper’s numbers way more interesting, who instead of wasting time and money jumping from room to room decided to get just one room and put 50 Playboy bunnies in there for himself. Undoubtedly two very different, though equally respectable, ways of finding oneself.

However, it wasn’t all laughs at 8221 Sunset Boulevard… one night in March 1982, three dudes with real bad reputations met up there to do suitably bad things. They were Robert de Niro, Robin Williams and John Belushi. At dawn, the first two went home, but the third kept going and going and ended up partying forever… 5 days later he was found dead in his room, having overdosed on a speedball (a mixture of heroin and cocaine) injection, a combination less advisable than an eye drop with Super Glue 3.

 

If you are wondering whether all this cool and crazy stuff really happened in the Marmont, and how is it possible then it’s down to the fact that one of the secrets of the hotel’s success is discretion. In fact, there are hardly any photos or videos of the things I’ve just told you about, so many of them are hover somewhere between reality and rumour. So as Harry Cohn, founder of Columbia Pictures, once said: “If must get in to trouble, always do it at the Chateau Marmont.”

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Make diners great again

MAKE DINERS GREAT AGAIN

Por Laura Martínez / Foto: Adam Johnston

Diners, those eternal symbols of American pop culture, omnipresent 20 years ago, are now in the doldrums. Exorbitant rents and generational change have affected a sector that refuses to be a relic of a bygone age. These wonderful eateries have played key roles in some of cinema’s most iconic scenes.

 

n 1990, the hipster-glassed genius Martin Scorsese released “Goodfellas”, the cult classic that is one of the most foul-mouthed movies in history (the word f**k is used 300 times). This masterpiece has a scene where Joe Pesci and Ray Liotta are waiting to steal a truck from the car park of one of the oldest diners in New York: The Airline Diner. This classic is now owned by the Jackson Hole franchise, which luckily maintained the diner’s interior design and façade intact when they took over. Opened back in 1952, its famous old neon ‘Airline’ sign, classic pink and chrome interior, original jukeboxes and the gumball machine are authentic relics.

Another diner that has hosted its share of shoots is Dinah’s Family Restaurant in L.A. Movies like “Little Miss Sunshine” and “Drive” filmed scenes there, featuring greasy spoon classics such as pancakes washed down with strawberry milkshakes and coffee, served at its unmistakable semicircle sofas. The two most famous movies shot there are “The Big Lebowski” and “Pulp Fiction”. The Coen brothers comedy, full of unforgettable quotes, filmed a scene here where those nihilists that The Dude warned us about (“These guys don’t believe in anything”) gathered. One of these nihilists could have been Vincent Vega, who also sat down to breakfast in Dinah’s in Tarantino’s blockbuster. The house speciality (apart from movie shoots) is fried chicken and ribs with barbecue sauce.

 

Let’s continue with Tarantino and his obsession with these calorific temples. The first location he used for a film was, precisely, a diner, Pat & Lorraine’s Coffee Shop in Los Angeles. The scene in “Reservoir Dogs” has Mr Pink (Steve Buscemi) explaining his reluctance to leave money for waiters with the immortal line “I don’t tip,” a comment that leads to a heated debate between the characters, including Mr Brown (Quentin himself).

A list about the cinema’s essential diners couldn’t be complete without mentioning “Mullholland Drive” by David Lynch.” Winkie’s Diner – now called Caesar’s – is the place where one character describes his dream about a terrifying troll who runs the diner. If you wanna recreate this scene for yourself, you’ll have to travel to Gardena, south of L.A.

There’s also a diner in Ibiza that has been getting a lot of attention: Romeo’s Motel & Diner. Concept’s latest establishment has already hosted lots of shoots, with the most talked about being Diana Kunst filming part of the video for The Rolling Stones song “Criss Cross.” Our succulent menu features a selection of impossibly large milkshakes and the best hot dogs you’ve ever tasted. All of course without forgetting the Mediterranean touch. It looks like diner culture is gonna be with us for a little while longer…

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